Tobacco Cessation

You may not remember your reasons for starting to smoke, but here are three good reasons to quit:

  • You’ll be more likely to resist colds and flu
  • You’ll look and feel healthy
  • You’ll save money

Check out what the research says:

  • Just the Facts

    Did You Know?

    The Good

    • 1 year after quitting, the excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of someone who still smokes. Your heart attack risk drops dramatically.
    • Significant bone loss has been found in older women and men who smoke. Quitting smoking appears to reduce the risk for low bone mass and fractures. 
    • Smokers who quit at about age 30 "reduce their chance of dying prematurely from smoking-related diseases by more than 90 percent." 

    The Bad

    • Smoking negatively affects your sex life and reproductive system,  increases the risk of type 2 diabetes, and decreases immune system function.
    • Wherever smoke touches living cells, it does harm.
    • In 2015, the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults in Indiana was 20.6%. Nationally, the prevalence of cigarette smoking among adults was 17.5%.

    The Ugly

    • Secondhand smoke causes numerous health problems in infants and children, including more frequent and severe asthma attacks, respiratory infections, ear infections, and sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS). Smoking during pregnancy results in more than 1,000 infant deaths annually.
    • Nearly 30 percent of cancer deaths in the country can be attributed to tobacco use.
    • Smoking cigarettes kills more Americans than alcohol, car accidents, HIV, guns, and illegal drugs combined.

    Research

Kick the Habit

As many tobacco users know, kicking the habit is not easy. But success rates increase with every attempt to quit. At Indiana University and beyond, there are resources and support systems ready to help you quit tobacco!

  • Employee Resources

    IU Benefits Resources

    Available on All IU Campuses

    Eligibility: Full-time Academic and Staff employees and spouses who are enrolled in an IU-sponsored medical plan

    The Quit For Life Program offers an integrated mix of support tools to help stop using tobacco products. The program is telephone-based and accessible across all IU campuses. Participants have access to:

      • Five coaching calls with a “Quit Coach” to work with and set and reach a quit date
      • Nicotine replacement therapy (as needed)
      • One year of follow-up phone and Web assistance

    To enroll in Quit For Life, call 1-866-784-8454 or visit the Quit For Life Program Web site.

    Eligibility: Anyone enrolled in an IU-sponsored medical plan

    IU employee medical plans cover 100 percent of the cost of tobacco cessation prescription and over-the-counter tobacco replacement products. Coverage is limited to a 180-day supply per covered individual per year. Covered prescription drugs include Chantix, Zyban (bupropion), and Nicotrol. Over-the-counter products require a prescription in order to be covered under the employee’s medical plan.

    • Tobacco Affidavit

      Eligibility: Full-time Academic and Staff employees and spouses who are enrolled in an IU-sponsored medical plan

      During Open Enrollment, you can complete an affidavit indicating you and/or your spouse do not use tobacco and will not in the future. Completing the affidavit will reduce your premium contribution by $25 per month for you or your spouse, or $50 for both. Contact HRfor more information.

    Campus Resources

    The IUPUI campus offers tobacco cessation resources in addition to those listed above. 

    Community Resources

    Free, statewide resources:

    National Programs

    Free resources from national experts:

    • How to Quit Smoking or Smokeless Tobacco
      Information from the American Cancer Society on what you’re up against, what your options are, and where to go for help.
    • Smokefree.gov: Every Try Counts 
      Text message program to build the skills and confidence you need for your next quit. You’ll receive texts with challenges and tips to keep you on track.
    • Stop Smoking
      Tools, tips, and support from the American Lung Association.
  • Student Resources

    Campus Resources

    Some IU campuses offer tobacco cessation resources to students. 

    Community Resources

    Free, statewide resources:

    National Programs

    Free resources from national experts:

    • How to Quit Smoking or Smokeless Tobacco
      Information from the American Cancer Society on what you’re up against, what your options are, and where to go for help.
    • Smokefree.gov: Every Try Counts 
      Text message program to build the skills and confidence you need for your next quit. You’ll receive texts with challenges and tips to keep you on track.
    • Stop Smoking
      Tools, tips, and support from the American Lung Association.

If your friend or family member uses tobacco, and you want to help them in their journey to quit, check out these general hints from the American Cancer Society.

Did you know IU is a tobacco-free university? Find more information at Tobacco-Free IU.